July Fourth is here, a day where we celebrate the signing of the Declaration of Independence, solidifying our nation's formation.

But for many, it's the day when those poised to become U.S. citizens take the Oath of Allegiance.

That was the case for 48 people representing 31 countries, who became U.S. citizens during a naturalization ceremony at the Jimmy Carter Presidential Center in Atlanta. The event was part of the U.S. Citizenship and Immigration Services annual ceremony that welcomes around 2,300 new U.S. citizens in more than 30 ceremonies across the nation.

ALSO | 48 new citizens welcomed to America on July 4 at Carter presidential library

So what does it take to become a naturalized U.S. citizen?

First, according to the USCIS website, the person wishing to become a citizen has to apply by completing a naturalization application.

After the USCIS accepts the application, hopefuls have to next go submit their biometrics, including fingerprints, photos and signatures. During this step, the FBI also conducts a background check.

Next comes for the naturalization interview, during which an English and civics test is given.

During this step, applicants must correctly answer six of 10 questions (from the list of 100) related to U.S. history, geography and civics.

Sample questions include:

"Who did the United States fight in World War II?"

"Name one state that borders Canada."

"What are two rights in the Declaration of Independence?"

"What is one promise you make when you become a U.S. citizen?"

(Scroll down to the bottom to get the answers -- no cheating!)

QUIZ | Civics practice test

Once an applicant successfully complete their interview and their application is approved, they finally take the Oath of Allegiance to become a U.S. citizen.

WOULD YOU PASS? | Click here to take the practice test